Monday, February 1, 2016

Christian Dior Resort 2016






I had the infinite pleasure of strolling past the Dior store on Collins Street whilst running late for my haircut. It just so happens that other luxury fashion houses MaxMara and Gucci are on the same street, but if you were to ask me, I couldn't remember what their windows looked like. This is because 1.) being late makes me very very anxious and 2.) they lacked the same dimension when compared to Dior. Following the unveiling of their Resort 2016 collection at the Bubble Palace presentation (somewhere between Cannes and Monaco) I've spent somewhere between one and six hours drooling over those patchwork boots. So to see them IRL, albeit separated by several inches of glass was super exciting for me. The shoes and mannequins were surrounded by an adult ball pit (no, there weren't sex toys in view) constructed from colourful metallic baubles. It was these shining baubles which prompted me to write the following blog post, but also just appreciate the installation as a piece of art which celebrates the festiveness of the holiday season without overtly shoving Christianity down everyone's throats. 






 Growing up, the only person to wear plaid on a regular basis was my dad (not a fashion forward person) who pretty much dedicated himself to flannelette shirts. In high school my world view was widened when I was introduced to plaid woolen skirts as part of my winter uniform, but felt betrayed when I was still freezing cold. Plaid isn't something I invest in today, but come to think of it I rarely see it in thrift stores, at the mall or online. Despite the print not being gendered in any specific way no one has really created tops or dresses which flatter the female figure whilst also generating a unique silhouette. Giving form to these thoughts and feelings through writing makes me contemplate how quickly I abandoned sewing/ textile design as a past time in school and wonder if I could have experimented with design in the same way. My ultimate conclusion is probably not, but the mere fact that there is a small chance that maybe I could have made something equally innovative fills me with deep longing.  






Unlike many other runway reviews, where I take images from Style.com/ Vogue.com I actually prefer the images taken by UK fashion blogger Susie Bubble. Personally I just thought the models weren't framed up to the usual standard. My eyes were watering at the thought of having to inspect the clothes on my computer screen using a fucking telescope. Usually I don't care too much about the FRO since in many instances the images produced are mediocre at best, with Susie proving an exception to the rule and understanding what are the most important aspects of the clothes. There's not much else I can say, other than maybe the media were too far away from the action? Meh. I doubt there would be the same amount of detail, especially when it comes to the shoes. For me, as with other Dior collections when Raf Simons was in power, the shoes were the star of the show. That's not to say I wouldn't love to wear the clothes but the high street wouldn't be able to mass produce/ profit from the shoes in the same way they copy the shape and cut of the clothes.








 As the show progresses, the prints become more busy and the patterns increasingly abstract. Sidebar: can we just take a moment to appreciate the red head Yuan Bo Chao who looks like a modern Little Mermaid spin-off. Also, I'm really digging the layering of printed long sleeve shirts under trumpet pleated dresses with deep V-necks. It reminds me of the 90s trend of wearing t-shirts under sun dresses, something I was personally too young to attempt myself, but would have undoubtedly been subjected to, given that my mother still tries to control what I wear today. One thing I did notice is that the cut, hemline and general structure of every dress is carefully chosen to compliment the dress colour and pattern. Being able to discern which type of straps, bust line and waist accentuate a pattern is something that distinguishes the genius of Simons from that of budding designers. Shout out to the metallic blue dress with raw hemline which has my weak at the knees for reasons that I can't explain. 








Images 1-6 via Vogue.com, the rest are Style Bubble.

8 comments:

  1. love all the pieces!

    xx
    http://www.cherry-mag.com

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  2. Susie's photos are quite possibly my most favourite style of runway photos ever. And re: plaid, I think of Burberry's more-than-generous use of the print never ever quite shaped up to be, for lack of a better term, high fashion like we're actually seeing in this Dior collection.

    Ugh and those boots are perfect.

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    1. agreed, while Burberry's trench is iconic it never really reached a worldwide audience, purely because the trench isn't something suitable for all climates

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  3. Just LOVVVE this whole collection! SOOOO fierce and cool! And all of the shoes are so obsessive! YAS!
    kisses
    xoThe Beckerman Girls

    www.BeckermanBlog.com

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    1. the shoes are basically my favourite things- thanks Beckerman Girls and congrats on getting snapped by Bill Cunningham!

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  4. this show gave me chills. Especially seeing Olivia Palermo (one of my favs) wearing the plaid mini dress during couture week. I love all the plaid . I think its so different for Dior and so wearable!

    www.werenotexclusive.com
    xo

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    1. plaid isn't something we see in many runway collections outside of LFW but that dress is gorgeous

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